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AYSO Area 11V

Referee Resources

AYSO Documents and Resources

AYSO.ORG Referee Resource Page  HERE

AYSO Rules & Regulations

Considerations for Analysis of Match Situations

General Documents and Resources

Online Training

Referee Pre-Game training / samples:

      Notes from Ken Aston HERE

      Training Overview HERE

      Wallet Pre-Game Card HERE

Restart matrix HERE

Ken Aston Camp Info HERE

Area 11V Referee Mentoring Program  HERE

CDC Concussion – Online Training HERE (on AYSO Training – Need AYSO ID. Cert will be automatically added to eAYSO Cert list)

Safe Haven – Online (Updated) HERE

FIFA Homepage

FIFA Laws of the Game HERE – Prior to 2016

USSF Advice to Referee HERE

USSF Homepage

2019/20 Law changes

Click here to download a PowerPoint of the law changes.
Click here to download a pdf of the law changes.

1. The coin toss (Law 8)Team winning the toss now chooses to:

  • Take the kick-off OR
  • Choose the goal to attack
2. Disciplinary action against team officials (Law 12)Team officials (e.g. coaches) may be:
  • Warned
  • Cautioned & shown the yellow card
  • Sent off & shown the red card
3. Dropped ball (Law 8)
Drop the ball to a SINGLE player in all cases

IF when play was stopped, the ball was INSIDE the penalty area or was LAST TOUCHED in the penalty area, drop the ball to the goalkeeperOTHERWISE, drop the ball:
  • TO ONE PLAYER of the team that last touched the ball
  • AT THE POINT of the last touch by a player, outside agent, or match official
  • IN ALL CASES, ALL OTHER PLAYERS (from both teams) must be at least 4.5 yards away
4. Ball hits a match official (Law 9)
  • Drop the ball if the ball touches a match official, stays on the field, and
  • Goes into the goal OR
  • Team possession changes OR
  • A promising attack starts
5. Handling the ball (“handball offence”) (Law 12)
It is an offence if a player: 
  • Deliberately touches the ball with their hand/arm (no change here)
  • Gains possession/control of the ball after it has touched their hand/arm and then
  • Scores in the opponents’ goal
  • Creates a goal-scoring opportunity
  • Scores in the opponents’ goal directly from their hand/arm, even if accidental, including by the goalkeeper
6. Goalkeeper handling changes (Laws 10 and 12)
  • Restart if the goalkeeper throws the ball directly into the opponents’ goal: goal kick (Law 10)
  • If the goalkeeper clearly kicks or attempts to kick the ball from a throw-in or deliberate kick from a team-mate but the ‘clearance’ fails, the goalkeeper then can handle the ball (Law 12)

7. No attackers in the wall (Law 13)
  • IF three (or more) defenders form a wall for the taking of a free kick THEN all attackers must be at least 1 yd from the wall until the ball is in play
RESTART FOR OFFENCE: Indirect free kick for the defending team

8. Penalty kick modifications (Law 14)
  • The goalkeeper must keep ONE FOOT on or above the line until the ball is kicked
  • The penalty kick taker, if assessed quickly for injury, does not have to leave & can take the kick (Law 5)

9. Goal kicks & defensive free kicks within a team’s own penalty area (Laws 16 and 13)
  • The ball is in play when it is kicked and clearly moves. The ball does NOT have to leave the penalty area to be in play. Opponents STILL MUST remain outside the penalty area UNTIL the ball is in play
10U WITH BUILD-OUT LINE: On a goal kick, the opponents may cross the build-out line when the ball is in play (kicked and clearly moves). (Player Development Initiatives, not in the Laws of the Game)

2018/19 Law Changes

Law changes 2018/19

Summary of main changes

LAW 4 – THE PLAYERS’ EQUIPMENT

  • Player who has left the field because of an equipment issue and returns without permission and interferes with play is penalized with a direct free kick (or penalty kick)

LAW 5 – THE REFEREE

  • Match officials are not permitted to wear cameras

LAW 10 – DETERMINING THE OUTCOME OF A MATCH

  • Kicks from the penalty mark – a replacement for a goalkeeper cannot take a kick in that ‘round’ if the goalkeeper has already taken a kick

LAW 12 – FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

  • Biting is included as a direct free kick and sending-off offence
  • Throwing an object at the ball or hitting the ball with a held object are separate direct free kick offences (not a form of handball)
  • If the ball rebounds from the goalkeeper this does not prevent the goalkeeper handling the ball a second time even if the first attempt to catch/holds the ball was deliberate
  • If the referee plays advantage for a DOGSO the offender is cautioned (YC) whether or not a goal is scored
  • Excessively showing the TV signal is a caution (YC)
  • Where 2 separate cautionable (YC) offences are committed in close proximity, both cautions (YCs) must be issued; same principle if one is a sending off offence
  • If a player commits an offence outside the field of play (ball in play) against someone from their own team (including a team official) it is an indirect free kick on the boundary line

LAW 13 – FREE KICKS

  • Clarification that free kicks can also be awarded for offences by a substitute, substituted or sent off player, or a team official

LAW 15 – THE THROW-IN

  • A player must stand to take a throw-in (kneeling, sitting etc. not permitted)


Summary of Law Changes, Explanation and AYSO Impact

LAW 4 – THE PLAYERS’ EQUIPMENT

  • Player who has left the field because of an equipment issue and returns without permission and interferes is penalized with a direct free kick (or penalty kick)

1.    Offences and sanctions

Additional Text

A player who enters without permission must be cautioned and if play is stopped to issue the caution, an indirect free kick is awarded from the position of the ball when play was stopped, unless there was interference in which case a direct free kick (or penalty kick) is awarded from the position of the interference.

Explanation:
Clarifies the restart if a player returns without the necessary permission and interferes (consistent with Law 3).

AYSO impact:
Minimum. This is rarely seen. Referees and ARs should work together to make sure players do not reenter the field of play without permission.

LAW 5 – THE REFEREE

  • Match officials are not permitted to wear cameras

1.    Referee’s equipment Other equipment

Additional Text

Referees and other ‘on-field’ match officials are prohibited from wearing jewelry or any other electronic equipment, including cameras.

Explanation:
Clarifies that referees and other ‘on-field’ match officials are not permitted to use or wear cameras.

AYSO impact:
Minimum. However there are a number of reasons AYSO referees should not wear a GoPro-type camera, including Safe Haven considerations.

LAW 10 – DETERMINING THE OUTCOME OF A MATCH

  • Kicks from the penalty mark – a replacement for a goalkeeper cannot take a kick in that ‘round’ if the goalkeeper has already taken a kick.

1.    Kicks from the penalty mark Procedure

Additional Text

  •  A goalkeeper who is unable to continue before or during the kicks may be replaced (…) but the replaced goalkeeper takes no further part and may not take a kick. If the goalkeeper has already taken a kick, the replacement may not take a kick until the next round of kicks

Explanation:
Clarifies that if a goalkeeper is replaced and has taken a kick, the replacement may not take a kick in that ‘round’ of kicks.

AYSO impact:
Minimum. This is rarely seen. But referees need to be aware of the change should such an event occur.

LAW 12 – FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

  • Biting is included as a direct free kick and sending-off offence
  • Throwing an object at the ball or hitting the ball with a held object are separate direct free kick offences (not a form of handball)

1.    Direct free kick

A direct free kick is awarded if a player commits any of the following offences:

  • (…)
  • Bites or spits at an opponent someone
  • Throws an object at the ball, opponent or match official, or makes contact with the ball with a held object
  • Deleted text
  • Handling the ball
  • Touching the ball with an object held in the hand (clothing, shinguard etc.) is an offence
  • Hitting the ball with a thrown object (boot, shinguard etc.) is an offence

Explanation:

  • Reference to biting (a rare offence) as a direct free kick offence (and also in the list of sending-off offences)
  • Throwing an object at the ball or making contact with the ball with a held object becomes a separate category of offence and not part of handball so a goalkeeper can be penalized for such conduct in their penalty area.

AYSO impact:
Minimum. These situations are rare, but referees need to be aware of the change should such events occur.


  • If the ball rebounds from the goalkeeper this does not prevent the goalkeeper handling the ball a second time even if the first attempt to catch/holds the ball was deliberate

1.    Indirect free kick

Amended text

A goalkeeper is considered to be in control of the ball when:

  • the ball is between (…) or by touching it with any part of the hands or arms except if it rebounds accidentally from the goalkeeper or the… (…)

Explanation:
Goalkeepers often unsuccessfully attempt to catch/hold/stop or ‘parry’ the ball but as this is a ‘deliberate’ touch with the hand(s) they have technically controlled the ball so cannot pick it up. This is not the Law’s intention and is not enforced; removal of ‘accidentally’ clarifies the Law.

AYSO impact:
This is already how this situation is dealt with. This change makes clarifies the spirt of the Law and makes it official.


  • If the referee plays advantage for a DOGSO the offender is cautioned (YC) whether or not a goal is scored

1.    Disciplinary action Advantage

Amended text

If the referee plays the advantage for an offence for which a caution / send off would have been issued had play been stopped, this caution / send off must be issued when the ball is next out of play, except when for the denial of an obvious goal-scoring opportunity results in a goal when the player is cautioned for unsporting behavior."

Explanation:
If the referee plays advantage for a DOGSO and a goal is scored, it is a YC but technically, if no goal results, the Law said it should be a RC. This is never applied and is not seen as ‘fair’ as applying the advantage effectively means that a goal-scoring opportunity remains; consequently, a YC is the fairest sanction, whether or not a goal is scored.

AYSO impact:
Referees should now show a YC if advantage is played for a DOGSO and a goal is not scored. There should be very few occasions when advantage is played for a DOGSO foul; there must be a clear and obvious opportunity for a goal to be scored.


  • Excessively showing the TV signal is a caution (YC)
  • Where 2 separate cautionable (YC) offences are committed in close proximity, both cautions (YCs) must be issued; same principle if one is a sending off offence

1.    Disciplinary action Cautionable offences

Additional text

  • A player is cautioned if guilty of:
  • (…)
  • excessively using the ‘review’ (TV screen) signal
  • A substitute or substituted player is cautioned if guilty of:
  • (…)
  • excessively using the ‘review’ (TV screen) signal

Where two separate cautionable offences are committed (even in close proximity), they should result in two cautions, for example if a player enters the field of play without the required permission and commits a reckless tackle or stops a promising attack with a foul/handball, etc.

Explanation:
Inclusion of excessively using the review (TV) signal in the list of cautionable offences

Clarifies the action the referee should take where 2 clearly separate cautionable (YC) offences occur which may be linked, particularly when someone enters the field without permission (where needed) and then commits a cautionable offence. This principle also applies to sending-off offences.

AYSO impact:
With the introduction of VAR, we have already seen the TV review signal being used in games. Though not always so, this can be a signal of dissent, and is now a cautionable (YC) offense.


  • Referees must now link two cautionable (YC) offenses when they are linked, such as in the example above.
  • Biting is included as a direct free kick and sending-off offence

1.    Disciplinary action Sending-off offences

Additional text

A player, substitute or substituted player who commits any of the following offences is sent off:

  • (…)
  • Biting or spitting at an opponent or any other person someone

Explanation:
Inclusion of biting as a sending-off offence.


  • If a player commits an offence outside the field of play (ball in play) against someone from their own team (including a team official) it is an indirect free kick on the boundary line

1.    Restart of play after fouls and misconduct Sending-off offences

Additional text

If, when the ball is in play:

  • (…)
  • If an offence is committed outside the field of play against a player, substitute, substituted player or team official of their own team, play is restarted with an indirect free kick on the boundary line closest to where the offence occurred.
  • If a player makes contact with the ball with an object held in the hand (boot, shinguard etc.) play is restarted with a direct free kick (or penalty kick).

Explanation:
Clarifies:

  • How the game is restarted if a player commits an offence off the field of play against someone from their own team (including a team official).
  • That hitting the ball with an object held in the hand is a separate offence and not part of handball; consequently, a goalkeeper can be penalized for such conduct in their own penalty area.

 

AYSO impact:
Minimum. This rarely happens, but referees need to be aware of the change should this event occur. Note the clarification of offenses against opposing players or team officials, and own players or team officials.

LAW 13 – FREE KICKS

  • Clarification that free kicks can also be awarded for offences by a substitute, substituted or sent off player, or a team official

1. Types of free kick

Additional text

Direct and indirect free kicks are awarded to the opposing team of a player, substitute, substituted or sent off player, or team official guilty of an offence.

Explanation:
The Laws permit substitutes, substituted and sent off players, and team official to be penalized with a free kick for some offences.

AYSO impact:
Minimum. This rarely happens, but referees need to be aware of the change should this event occur.

Law 15 – The Throw-In

A player must stand to take a throw-in (kneeling, sitting etc. not permitted)

1.    Procedure Amended text At the moment of delivering the ball, the thrower must:

face stand facing the field of play

Explanation:
Clarifies that a player must stand to take a throw in i.e. sitting or kneeling positions are not permitted.

AYSO impact:
Minimum. This rarely happens, but referees need to be aware of the change should this event occur. Also note that in AYSO, allowances may be made for players who lack the normal use of both hands, so long as all other legal requirements are met.

 

2017 Law update summary

ALL LAWS

  • Replace ‘infringement/infringe’ etc. with ‘offence/offend’ etc.

LAW 1 – THE FIELD OF PLAY

  • Artificial turf may be used for the lines on a grass field if not dangerous

LAW 3 – THE PLAYERS

  • National FAs can allow a maximum of five substitutions (except at the top level)
  • National FAs can now allow return substitutions in youth, veterans and disability football
  • Clearer wording for the substitution procedure
  • A substitution made at half-time without informing referee is not a caution (YC) offence
  • Changing the goalkeeper at half-time without informing the referee is not a caution (YC)
  • Player who enters the field of play without the referee’s permission (if it is required) and interferes is punished with a direct free kick (FK)
  • Team scoring a goal with an extra person on the field is punished with a direct FK

 LAW 4 – THE PLAYERS’ EQUIPMENT

  • Goalkeeper caps are not included in the list of restrictions on head covers
  • Players are not permitted to wear/use any electronic or communication equipment, except electronic performance and tracking systems/EPTS); technical staff may only use communication equipment for safety/welfare issues
  • All EPTS equipment must bear a minimum safety standard mark


LAW 5 – THE REFEREE

  • Important statement that decisions made by match officials must always be respected
  • National FAs can allow temporary dismissals (sin bins) for some/all cautions (YC) in youth, veterans, disability and grassroots football (Guidelines for both systems will be published)
  • A medical official guilty of a dismissible offence may stay/treat players if no other medical person is available for the team

 LAW 7 – THE DURATION OF THE MATCH

  • A short drinks break is permitted at half-time of extra time

 LAW 8 – THE START AND RESTART OF PLAY

  • Kicker can stand in the opponents’ half at the kick-off

 LAW 10 – DETERMINING THE OUTCOME OF A MATCH

  • Extra time must be two equal periods, maximum 15 minutes each

 Kicks from the penalty mark (KFPM)

  • Corrected wording for goalkeeper who is unable to continue
  • Excluded player may replace a goalkeeper even if team has used all its permitted substitutes
  • Kicker may not play the ball a second time
  • A goalkeeper who offends and the penalty has to be retaken must be cautioned (YC)
  • If the kicker offends the kick is forfeited (recorded as ‘missed’)
  • If the goalkeeper and kicker offend at the same time: retake and two cautions (YCs) if no goal is scored
  • If a goal is scored the kicker is cautioned (YC) and kick recorded as ‘missed’

 LAW 11 – OFFSIDE

  • An offside player can be penalised if the ball rebounds/deflects off a match official
  • Addition of ‘attempts to’ to the definition of a ‘save’
  • Offside guidance:
    • player in offside position who impedes an opponent must be penalised
    • player in offside position who is fouled before committing an offside offence – foul penalised
    • player in offside position who is fouled when already committing an offside offence – offside penalised

 

LAW 12 – FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

  • Verbal offences are punished with an indirect FK
  • If an advantage is played for a sending-off (RC) and the player commits another offence, that offence is penalised
  • A player ‘stopping a promising attack’ in the penalty area is not cautioned (YC) if the offence was an attempt to play the ball
  • Addition to list of cautions (YCs) for a ‘denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity’
  • (DOGSO) offence in the penalty area which was an attempt to play the ball
  • Caution (YC) for goal celebration which causes safety/ security issue
  • If player moves diagonally to pass the last defender/goalkeeper this can still be a DOGSO
  • Clearer DOGSO wording for a penalty area offence which is an attempt to play the ball
  • Entering the field of play without permission and stopping a goal or DOGSO is a sendingoff
  • Off-field offence by/against a player involving opposing player/substitute/team official (or against a match official) is penalised by FK on the boundary line if the ball is in play
  • Direct FK for throwing or kicking ball/object onto the field to interfere with play/someone
  • Direct FK on boundary line for throwing or kicking ball/object at someone off the field

 

LAW 13 – FREE KICKS

  • Attacker in or entering the penalty area before a defensive FK has left the area cannot play or challenge for the ball until it has been touched by another player

 

LAW 14 – THE PENALTY KICK

  • Kicker must be clearly identified
  • If the goalkeeper and kicker offend at the same time: retake and two cautions (YCs) if no goal is scored
  • if a goal is scored the kicker is cautioned (YC) and kick recorded as ‘missed’ (see Law 10)
  • Goal can be awarded after outside interference if the ball still goes in the goal

 

LAW 16 – THE GOAL KICK

  • Attacker entering the penalty area cannot play or challenge for the ball until it is touched by another player

2016/17 Changes to LOTG


For 2016, the IFAB (International Federation Football Association) has rewritten the Laws of the game. There are significant differences throughout the laws. Please see the links below for a summary presentation and the link to the new laws hosted on the IFAB web site. The implementation for these new laws is still TBD.

Link to Law change Summary – HERE

Link to New LOTG – HERE

 

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